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A Letter to The Digitally Unemployed: 20-Somethings Keep Searching Online

Sitting in JFK on my way to Boston, I see a lot of 20-somethings scouring their iPhones,  iPads, laptops and other devices, searching, many and most I take a look at, actually Facebook-ing more so than anything else. But, one person I see on their iPad in front of me getting coffee, she is using Indeed.com. What is she probably doing? I’m guessing what almost 10 percent of the US is doing – searching for a job.

It makes me think for a second about the current job market as opportunisitic for some, and an absolute struggle for many others. As newly-graduated college students now make their way to the workforce, they arrive at a time when unemployment rate teeters just below 10%.

Unemployment Rate

I think of this age group as having the most power at their hands to access available jobs these days, using those same devices they bury themselves in to look toward the internet for guidance and help in their job search.

Let’s consider the sites and do a little quantitative digging shall we? Let’s look at the keyword “job” to see what sites receive the most traffic:

Indeed.com received approximately 12 million site referrals when someone searches for the keyword “jobs” online. While Monster.com and CareerBuilder.com receive approximately four times less search referrals.

As a keyword search continues to drive traffic, does this chart look somewhat similar to the Google chart reflecting unemployment above?

 


The top four job sites show an increase in traffic as unemployment rose through the year. Indeed.com and Careerbuilder.com saw a significant traffic increase between April and May. Unemployment rose again between May and June and only Indeed.com saw an increase in traffic. And looking further into the data,  the demographics of each site are also additional indicators to consider.
The demographics for the top three sites showed:

 Monster.com

Indeed.com

Careerbuilder.com


15-16% of unique visitors to the top job sites were between the ages of 18-24. While the largest demographic of unique visitors are not 20-Somethings- who might be the most comfortable online- job search sites are receiving traffic from online users of all ages. Expanding on a point that ever-expanding 35+ demographic is growing in multiple ways online, but that’s for another post.

Your thoughts…what do you use for your online job search?

(Certain elements of this article were taken from the Compete.com article here)

2 Responses to “A Letter to The Digitally Unemployed: 20-Somethings Keep Searching Online”

  1. Alyssa says:

    That is an interesting perspective and reads a little like this article… http://blog.compete.com/2011/07/20/the-digitally-unemployed-are-20-somethings-searching-online/ especially since there is no attribution to the original article.

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